The Physiology of Psychological Type, Part II

So much has been discovered in the past ten to twenty years that it is now possible to be relatively certain about the physiological bases for Dr. Jung's Typology. To start with, one can begin to understand the physiology of Jung's four functions, by developing a working familiarity with the following physiological terms.

So much has been discovered in the past ten to twenty years that it is now possible to be relatively certain about the physiological bases for Dr. Jung's Typology. To start with, one can begin to understand the physiology of Jung's four functions, by developing a working familiarity with the following physiological terms:

Subsequently, by juxtaposing what we now understand about the human brain and nervous system with the nature, pattern and structure of Jung's Typology.

With only a preliminary understanding of these terms and an understanding of Dr. Carl Jung's typological model and observations, one can quite readily come to not only a new appreciation for the accuracy or Dr.Jung's observations, but as well, an extended understanding of their implications for the individual seeking to thrive and for professionals — therapists, career counselors, life planning counselors, marriage counselors - seeking to counsel that individual with support and guidance.

Indeed, as you will soon appreciate, given adequate grounding in contemporary neuroscience, one can understand clearly how:

  1. Jung's four Functions are rooted in four distinct areas of the cortex;

  2. Jung's observation that each of us has one and only one Natural Lead Function which functions as our personal compass or "true north";

  3. Jung's appreciation for the fact that each Function has two Auxiliary Functions which serve as dependable helpers.

  4. Jung's observation concerning the identification of one's greatest Natural Weakness - that if a person's Natural Lead is Feeling, one will have the greatest difficulty developing and effectively using Thinking; or if one's Natural Lead is Intuition, one will have the greatest difficulty in developing and effectively using Sensation.

  5. The difference between the Feeling Function and Emotions.

  6. Jung's belief that Falsification of Type was real and a serious threat to a person's physical and mental / emotional health.

With no further ado, then, let's get into those all powerful terms, keeping in mind as we do that our current scientific knowledge of Brain Function is vastly more than Jung's as a result of work done in the past 5 to 25 years, as the United States established and supported research to support "The Decade of the Brain". Moreover, today, our knowledge is greater because that research has been made much more powerful by technological breakthroughs which allow us to do: three- dimensional, distance sensing accurately and in detail.

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